Mulberry madness

What colour are we calling this? Purple? Burgundy? Magenta? Plum? Mulberry?

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No, there’s nothing wrong with your eyes. This is a blurry photograph. Let’s call it an arty action shot, shall we?

Beetroot?

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Still swirling.

Having made a rather slapdash and short-lived version of this old English Woman magazine pattern once before, I took a bit of time to get this one right. There was a muslining operation, there were fitting tweaks (narrow the neckline, lengthen bodice, futz with darts til they were right) and an all-important bilateral pocket installation. I was thinking of frankensteining a straight skirt, but at the last minute the deflated balloon won out. (I’ve used the skirt pattern before in this tropicale number and this Burda concoction.)

The fabric is this cheapie poplin from Spotlight which is wonderfully crisp. It makes a swishy noise when I move so it sounds like I mean business. And the colour is fabulous.

I made a very quick and easy belt with a wide strip of leftover fabric and a big belt buckle I found on the road. Really, I did. One side has asphalt marks on it from where it was run over by a car. I am the recycling champion of the universe!

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12 thoughts on “Mulberry madness

  1. Love your dress, and the color is plum lovely. I’m just finishing up a shirtwaist dress myself. Can’t wait to wear it. The color is nowhere near as brilliant as your’s, but it’s cute anyway. I’m wearing it with a crazy bronze fake pleather belt that I made with a clear plastic round buckle.
    Today I found a hubcap in the street to replace the one that was stolen from my car. Got home and it had fallen off somewhere. Recycle and recycle.
    Oh well……

  2. I’d call the color “poke berry purple,” as in the little gifts that birds who have recently eaten poke berries liberally deposit on my automobile and patio. But perhaps you do not have pokeweed where you live. It is Phytolacca americana, and has probably been exported as an ornamental plant to Europe, centuries ago. American colonials in the 18th century used it to make a permanent ink, that to this day retains the reddish purple color so beautifully illustrated by your lovely frock.

  3. This is awesome, love the colour and the fit seems perfect too. Where in Aus are you? We’re having a sewing meetup at GJs fabrics on the 19th of Jan so you should stop by if you’re in the area. Cheers.

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